Canning Stock Route – 1

Map of the Canning Stock Route from Wikepedia.

Travelling the Canning Stock Route was an incredible experience. We were 16 passengers of mature years with 4 incredible blokes in 2 4 wheel drive vehicles towing trailers and 2 6 wheel trucks. We are on the track for 14 days and saw half a dozen other vehicles and one Polish fellow riding a bike along the route.

Track from inside the kitchen truck.

Track from inside the kitchen truck.

A truck went ahead of each of the 4 wheel drive vehicles to pull then out of the sand if necessary. This happened a few times.

One of the 600 plus sand hills

One of the 600 plus sand hills

Everything had to be carry but there was a food drop off near the Kunawarritji Aboriginal Community where we bought ice creams. Water was replenished from the few now operating wells and there is a fuel dump by the Capricorn Roadhouse at Well 23.

Three flat tyres.

Three flat tyres.

Alfred Canning and his team sunk 52 wells starting in 1907 to enable stock from the Kimberley region to be driven to Wiluma and then to the goldfields around Kalgoolie. He was bought back later to repair the wells. The last cattle drive was in 1959. The first vehicles were driven the length of the route in 1968. Many of the wells are in disrepair but the voluntary TrackCare Group have repaired a number of wells and those now attempting the trip can access a list of the wells with drinkable, accessible water.

Well in disrepair

Well in disrepair

Repaired well

Repaired well

A few wells had windmills pumping the water.

A few wells had windmills pumping the water.

The next post will go more into the amazing array of wild flowers we saw and the landscape.

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20 Comments

Filed under Canning Stock Route, Travel

20 responses to “Canning Stock Route – 1

  1. kathymarris

    What an interesting expedition into the ‘never never’. Not sure whether I would enjoy the bumpy ride!

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  2. elephantwoman

    So the wells tap into good sources of ground water? It seems fairly arid out there, I’m surprised there are so many wells – although maybe 52 wells is not so many for such a long route.

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    • The wells were originally placed the distance cattle walk in a day, roughly 15 miles apart. They sunk them also in soaks which the Aboriginal people used. They were unable to use the ‘new fangled’ wells so their living was disrupted.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Sha

    This looks pretty awesome….such an exciting adventure! 🙂

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  4. I have walking sox that still have red dust in them after 7 or 8 years. Good luck with the washing.

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  5. Jan Hume

    It’s a different world! Love the pix.

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  6. That country has to be seen to be believed. What a wonderful experience for you! The colour of the dirt is so beautiful against the blue skies!!

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  7. Emma Parker

    Amazing pics!

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  8. kerryilsley

    Just love sitting in my PJs in Fairlight, and sharing your spectacular trip. Fabulous photos as always. Thanks Pat. Kerry

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  9. susangirard

    wow Pat what a great adventure.

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  10. Looks like you’re having a wild ride. Good for you.

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