Panama Canal

Bridge of the Americas

Bridge of the Americas

Going through the Panama Canal was one of the main reasons I chose this trip. I was not disappointed. We appraoched the Bridge of the Americas on the Pacific side of the canal, about 6.20 am. Then the Miraflores Locks which looked as if the Queen Victoria would not fit.

Miraflores Locks

Miraflores Locks

We had a local commentator on board. She explained that ropes were attached to the ship and pulled by three electric engines, called Mules, to keep the ship straight. The ropes were taken to the ship by men in rowing boats. The guide explained that harpoons had been tried but too dangerous for the person catching the rope and then outboard motors but they are prone to not starting so it is back to 2 men in rowing boats. They are minute in comparison to the size of these ships. They practise throwing at bullseyes on the sides of the locks.

We went through the locks accompanyied by a car carrier and a tanker in the lock beside.

Car carrier just ahead in lock to the right.

Car carrier just ahead in lock to the right.

The ropes from the tanker to one of the mules

The ropes from the tanker to one of the mules

Centenniel Bridge

Centenniel Bridge

The Queen Victoria just seemed to fit into the locks, new wider locks are under construction on the Pacific side and the edges of the cuts linking the locks to Gatun Lake are being cut away to enable larger ships to use the canal.

Gap between Queen Victoria and the side of the lock

Gap between Queen Victoria and the side of the lock

New locks under construction.

New locks under construction.

Edge of Ship

Edge of Ship

The side of the Queen Victoria, part of the new construction and I have absolutely no idea about the lighthouse.

A gread day was had by all and we all went to bed tired but happy.

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6 Comments

Filed under Queen Victoria

6 responses to “Panama Canal

  1. Victoria

    what an adventure! looks v industrial. glad to hear about the rainforest. had no idea huge ships like that could go into locks. its amazing 🙂

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  2. Jan Hume

    Interesting and good pix. I’m doing a bit of vicarious travel – on SBS there’s a series on train tourism in Europe hosted by Michael Portillo using a very old travel guide. Last Sat I saw the lovely Lake Como again.

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  3. Val

    Looks like you all had to hold your breath there for a sec – not much wiggle room!!

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  4. Great pictures and description, Pat. How long did it take to go through?

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    • The pilot came on board at 5 am and we were out on the Atlantic side just after 4 pm. It was very hazy. Different from what I imagined, rain forest on side of the lake and lots of waterways going off, very, very scenic.

      Liked by 1 person

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